17-hon no kata

17-hon no kata

Kata in general consist mainly of offensive and defensive methods. Although there is no visible attack (for the untrained eyes) in the 17-hon no kata “toshu” method , there has to be an offensive and defensive action.

  • Uke’s attitude towards Tori has to be an offensive one. Uke is projecting his attacking mind forward in the direction of Tori.
  • Tori attitude towards Uke has to be a controlling one. Tori is grasping the attacking mind and neutralize it.

17-hon awase movement

Tegatana awase

nocquet tegatana011Tegatana awase is mostly referred as a sensitivity exercise when Tori and Uke have their tegatana together. This is not only the case in Tomiki Aikido but in all Aikido methods where Tegatana Awase is used.
Morihei Ueshiba & André Nocquet putting together the tegatana.

Touching the tegatana in 17-hon no kata is an important part of the performance. It is the first physical contact with Uke. Losing the fight starts here.

Benefits of kata training

When kata is done with the correct attitude, the are a lot of benefits for body and mind. The attitude of offensive and defensive actions is one of the most important elements in the kata training. Without these actions kata becomes an empty performance, a display without a soul.

Kata can be very beneficial as physical training, especially if Uke accept the many stretching movements during the performance.

ukemi forwardUkemi can be very demanding and is a form of cardio training. It is the task of Tori to keep always control of Uke, even when Uke is performing ukemi.

Throwing Uke in a violent way has to be avoided. Controlling Uke with pain is not the preferred way and shows a lack of skill in controlling violence.

Because the roles of Tori and Uke are set, precision becomes another element in the performance of the kata. Without proper technical and mental skill, kata becomes a dull and boring training tool. Learning precision is an important benefit of proper kata training.

About shobukaidojo

A passion for Martial Arts since 1964

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